The Hermitage Arboretum

Certified as a Level III Arboretum

Andrew Jackson’s Hermitage is certified as a Level III Arboretum by the Tennessee Urban Forestry Council.

Urban trees and green spaces play a vital role in air quality. The Hermitage is comprised of 1,120 acres of largely green spaces with forest areas and fields interspersed with trees. The Hermitage Arboretum is comprised of nearly 100 trees, which includes two Davidson County Champion American Holly Trees, six nearly 200 year-old cedars that line the mansion carriage drive, 19 different species of oak trees and, of course, five different species of hickory for “Old Hickory,” Andrew Jackson’s nickname.

LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR TREE SPECIES

What is an arboretum?

An arboretum is a collection of trees and shrubs, grown and maintained for educational and scientific purposes.

  • The Grounds History

    The Hermitage that Andrew Jackson knew had trees within the fenced yard of the mansion and inside the garden. Since the land had been cleared for farm fields and work yards, few trees existed near the mansion.

  • Beautifying the Land

    In 1889, The Hermitage became a museum, and generations of its stewards heavily planted the property with trees to “beautify” it.

  • Planting an Arboretum

    In 1968, the first arboretum at The Hermitage was planted at Tulip Grove Mansion. Many of those original arboretum trees form the foundation of today’s Hermitage Arboretum.

Download a Map of The Hermitage Arboretum

Arboretum trees are identified with a sign that has a QR code that links to additional information about each one.

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Funding The Hermitage Arboretum

Rachel’s Garden Fund and a grant from the Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee provided the funding to establish The Hermitage Arboretum.

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FAQs

Why are trees important?

Trees are essential to our lives. Trees provide habitat, capture rainfall and help control urban storm water runoff, provide shade, reduce excessive temperatures and remove dust and pollutants from the air. Trees also provide a number of intangible benefits to people, such as year-round beauty and reduced stress.